Debra Prinzing

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Episode 586: Flower farming on Hawaii’s Big Island with Christian Ingalls of Daisy Dukes Flower Farm

Wednesday, November 30th, 2022

It’s dreary and cold in many parts of North America, so I’ve invited farmer-florist Christian Ingalls of Daisy Dukes Flower Farm to warm us up and share her taste of the tropics with us today. But rather than tropical flowers, we’re in for a treat as Christian teaches us about growing temperate flowers on the Big Island of Hawaii. Her floral enterprise, Daisy Dukes Flower Farm is located in Papaaloa, home to a menagerie of animals, fruit trees and lots of flowers. Daisy Dukes Flower Farm produces temperate annuals, perennials, flowering bulbs, and herb crops — flowers not typically associated with the Aloha state.

Christian Ingalls of Daisy Dukes Flower Farm
Christian Ingalls of Daisy Dukes Flower Farm (c) Pomaikai Photo


Christian designs florals for weddings, events and special occasions. She wholesales flowers to chefs and florists, retails her flowers to local customers, and produces on-farm events like you-pick flowers and workshops.

Rainbow over Daisy Dukes Flower Farm
A full rainbow frames the vista and views from Daisy Dukes Flower Farm

Together, the interview and the farm tour will transport you to the big island of Hawaii and the exciting potential for growing temperate flowers there. Plus, you’ll get a jolt of sunshine just listening to Christian’s positive energy. It’s contagious.

Find and follow Daisy Dukes Flower Farm on Instagram


News of the Week

Slow Flowers Summit 2023 speakers
Top row, from left: Julio Freitas, Amy Balsters and Lennie Larkin
Middle row, from left: Gina Lett-Shrewsberry, Dee Hall, Tracy Yang and Valerie Chrisostomo
Bottom row, from left: Becky Feasby, Amber Tamm, Sarah Reyes and Debra Prinzing

Tomorrow is December 1st and we will be opening up the Early Bird Registration for Slow Flowers Summit 2023! We will extend a $100-off discount to members of the Slow Flowers Society and the general public who preregister for the Summit – through December 31st. Take advantage to lock in your registration and enjoy end-of-year savings. As our sixth Slow Flowers Summit, the event is scheduled for June 26-27, 2023, returning to the Seattle Area where it all began in 2017. Keep an eye out for our announcements in your in-box and on social media, including our Instagram account @slowflowerssummit — you’ll want to follow us there for up-to-the-minute information about the Summit, our program, our fantastic speakers, and the bonus features we’ll be adding in the coming months. It’s going to be our sixth Slow Flowers Summit, the best ever!


Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thank you to Johnny’s Selected Seeds, an employee-owned company that provides our industry the best flower, herb and vegetable seeds — supplied to farms large and small and even backyard cutting gardens like mine. Find the full catalog of flower seeds and bulbs at johnnysseeds.com.

Thank you to Mayesh Wholesale Florist. Family-owned since 1978, Mayesh is the premier wedding and event supplier in the U.S. and we’re thrilled to partner with Mayesh to promote local and domestic flowers, which they source from farms large and small around the U.S. Learn more at mayesh.com.

Thank you to The Gardener’s Workshop, which offers a full curriculum of online education for flower farmers and farmer-florists — like Christian Ingalls of Daisy Dukes Flower Farm. Online education is more important this year than ever, and you’ll want to check out the course offerings at thegardenersworkshop.com.


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining me today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 1.1 million times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too.

If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.


Music credits:

Nu Fornacis; Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad 
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 585: Diane Szukovathy and Dennis Westphall of Jello Mold Farm on the 10-year publication anniversary of The 50 Mile Bouquet

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2022

When it was published in 2012, The 50 Mile Bouquet was the first book to spotlight a major cultural shift and a transformation around how cut flowers are grown, designed and consumed, closely mirroring the culinary world’s locavore/slow food revolution.

Diane Szukovathy and Dennis Westphall
Diane Szukovathy and Dennis Westphall, photographed by Mary Grace Long (c) September 2012 at Jello Mold Farm in Mt. Vernon, Washington. (c) Mary Grace Long

One decade ago, the floral industry was just beginning to ask for changes, seeking alternatives to imported, mass-produced and chemical-laden flowers. The 50 Mile Bouquet introduced some of the innovative voices of the dynamic new Slow Flower Movement: the organic flower-farmers, the sustainably motivated floral designers . . . and the flower enthusiasts who were increasingly asking, ‘Where and how were my flowers grown, and who grew them?’

jellomoldbarn
Jello Mold Farm, fields, and barn
Dennis Westphall
Linda Blue captured Dennis performing at his own farm, Jello Mold, as a special feature of the Field to Vase Dinner Tour in September 2016.

The 50 Mile Bouquet’s documentary-feature reporting and photography took readers into the personal stories of Slow Flowers practitioners. Its relevance today is more important than ever, considering issues around climate change, supply-chain limitations, and equity in the marketplace.

Today’s guests involved me in their story, their flowers, and the renaissance of floral agriculture in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. I learned so much from them while interviewing and writing about the farms and design studios of Slow Flowers practitioners, even before I began to use the phrase, “slow flowers.”

Buckets of just-picked lilacs at Jello Mold Farm (c) Missy Palacol Photography
Buckets of just-picked lilacs at Jello Mold Farm (c) Missy Palacol Photography
A view
Jello Mold Farm and the distant views of Skagit Valley (Washington) (c) Missy Palacol Photography

Let’s jump right in and meet Diane Szukovathy and Dennis Westphall, co-founders of Jello Mold Farm, in Mt. Vernon, Washington, and part of the group that established the Seattle Wholesale Growers Market in 2011. I’m so grateful to Diane and Dennis for their support and friendship over the past 12 years since we met. They are both past guests of the Slow Flowers Podcast and I consider them sustainability leaders and pioneers of the Slow Flowers Movement.

WATCH Seattle Wholesale Growers Market: Farm to Florist Video Series (Lilacs)

Farm to Florist: Lilacs, filmed and edited by Alayna Erhart for Seattle Wholesale Growers Market; produced by Slow Flowers Society

Find and follow Jello Mold Farm on Instagram:
@jellomoldfarm
@mister.mold

Jello Mold Farm on Slow Flowers Podcast (Past Episodes):
December 2015: Episode 225: Slow Flowers’ Holiday Special with Musician-Flower Farmer Dennis Westphall
April 2017: Episode 294: A Floral Collective of Greater Good: Celebrating and Selling Local Flowers with the Seattle Wholesale Growers Market’s Sixth Anniversary


This Week’s News

Slow Flowers Summit 2023 speakers
Top row, from left: Julio Freitas, Amy Balsters and Lennie Larkin
Middle row, from left: Gina Lett-Shrewsberry, Dee Hall, Tracy Yang and Valerie Chrisostomo
Bottom row, from left: Becky Feasby, Amber Tamm, Sarah Reyes and Debra Prinzing

And head’s up– next week, on December 1st, we will open the early bird registration for the 2023 Slow Flowers Summit! We are extending a $100 discount to members of the Slow Flowers Society and the general public who preregister for the Summit – through December 31st. You’ll want to take advantage of this offer to lock in your registration and take advantage of end-of-year savings. You’ll be hearing much more about this wonderful event, taking place over two days — June 26-27, 2023, returning to the Seattle Area where it all began in 2017. Can’t wait to share the full program, speaker lineup and special features with you.


Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thank you to Red Twig Farms. Based in Johnstown, Ohio, Red Twig Farms is a family-owned farm specializing in peonies, daffodils, tulips and branches, a popular peony-bouquet-by-mail program and their Spread the Hope Campaign where customers purchase 10 tulip stems for essential workers and others in their community. Learn more at redtwigfarms.com.

Thank you to Longfield Gardens, which provides home gardeners with high quality flower bulbs and perennials. Their online store offers plants for every region and every season, from tulips and daffodils to dahlias, caladiums and amaryllis. Check out the full catalog at Longfield Gardens at longfield-gardens.com.

Thank you to the Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, a farmer-owned cooperative committed to providing the very best the Pacific Northwest has to offer in cut flowers, foliage and plants. The Growers Market’s mission is to foster a vibrant marketplace that sustains local flower farms and provides top-quality products and service to the local floral industry. Visit them at seattlewholesalegrowersmarket.com.


Gratitude for YOU

Lorene Edwards Forkner hands holding carrots
With gratitude for you xoxo

We’re airing this episode on Wednesday, November 23rd, the day prior to American Thanksgiving. I want to share my thanks with you and my gratitude for your ongoing support of this show. The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too.

If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.

Music credits:

Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad 
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Nice and Easy; In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 584: Farmer-florist Dee Hall of Mermaid City Flower Farm and founder of Black Flower Farmers

Wednesday, November 16th, 2022

I’m so thrilled today to share my recent conversation with Dee Hall. Dee is the owner and creative energy who operates a specialty cut flower and urban micro farm in Norfolk, Virginia, named Mermaid City Flowers.

Dee Hall in her garden
All photography (c) Sarah Bartley of Lumiere Creative Co.

She is featured in Black Flora by Teresa J. Speight, published by BLOOM Imprint earlier this year. Dee is quoted in the opening lines of the book, saying,

“I wanted people to know my business is rooted in joy. I wanted to take something I love and share it. Flowers are beautiful but also serve such a practical environmental function. I feel lucky to be a steward of the garden.”

Dee Hall, Mermaid City Flowers
Dee Hall with flowers

Dee follows sustainable, regenerative growing practices and has a special interest in native perennials. Her floral enterprise grows blooms for local customers, mostly sold through CSA subscribers and as everyday arrangements for local delivery.

Dee Hall cutting garden

Dee is collaborative and community-minded, having founded two important floral groups, The Tidewater Flower Collective, an organization providing continuing farming education, farm visits, and efforts to connect consumers with the source of their flowers, and Black Flower Farmers, an online virtual community of Black specialty cut flower farmers, found on Instagram and through the website blackflowerfarmers.com.

dee's porch

Lucky for me, Dee traveled from Virginia to Washington State last month to attend and design the flowers for a friend’s wedding here). She had time to swing by the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden on her way out of town, so we enjoyed lunch together inside my greenhouse, followed by a conversation we recorded for you. I so admire the leadership, gifts and talents that Dee brings to our Slow Flowers community, and I hope you get to know her! 

Find Mermaid City Flowers at these social places.

Mermaid City Flowers on Instagram


This Week’s News

2023 Member Survey

We’ve lots of fun announcements and opportunities to share this week:

First, the Slow Flowers Annual Member Survey opened on November 1st and continues through December 2nd — and we’d love for you to take a few moments to answer our questions. Your name will be entered into a drawing for 2 great thank you gifts:
(1) complimentary premium level membership for one year, valued at $249; and
(1) complimentary 2023 Slow Flowers Summit registration, valued at approximately $750. Those dates are June 25-26, 2023 and they will be held in Seattle. As I mentioned, to be included in the drawing, you must complete the survey by December 2nd and share your name and contact information with us.


Slow Flowers Journal Fall 2022

Next, hot off the press, have you seen our newest edition of Slow Flowers Journal? The digital quarterly is gorgeous and packed with inspiring and informative stories, essays, floral design, and creative resources. Slow Flowers Journal is a GardenComm gold award-winning publication and the subscription is free for Slow Flowers Members.

We’re sharing free access only to the Fall 2022 issue and you can find the link below. Starting in 2023, nonmembers will be asked to subscribe, so check it out and enjoy!


Thanks to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thank you to CalFlowers, the leading floral trade association in California, providing valuable transportation and other benefits to flower growers and the entire floral supply chain in California and 48 other states. The Association is a leader in bringing fresh cut flowers to the U.S. market and in promoting the benefits of flowers to new generations of American consumers. Learn more at cafgs.org.

Thank you to Store It Cold, creators of the revolutionary CoolBot, a popular solution for flower farmers, studio florists and farmer-florists.  Save $1000s when you build your own walk-in cooler with the CoolBot and an air conditioner.  Don’t have time to build your own?  They also have turnkey units available. Learn more at storeitcold.com.   

Thank you to the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers. Formed in 1988, ASCFG was created to educate, unite, and support commercial cut flower growers. It mission is to help growers produce high-quality floral material, and to foster and promote the local availability of that product. Learn more at ascfg.org.


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining us today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too. If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com.


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.


Music credits:

Yarrow and Root; Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 583: Farm and Studio Visit with Farmer-Florist Daniele Strawn of JoLee Blooms & Design in Sonoma County, California

Wednesday, November 9th, 2022

Today you will hear my interview with Daniele Strawn of JoLee Blooms & Design. In addition to our Q&A conversation, you are in for a treat, because Daniele shared two video tours that you’ll see in the YouTube video above. The video episode begins with a field and studio tour, recorded by Emma Wood and Daniele; that’s followed by my interview with Daniele, and we wrap up with a design demonstration that she filmed in her studio. Together these segments will give you a full picture of JoLee Blooms.

Daniele Strawn and Emma Wood
Armloads of JoLee Blooms-grown focal flowers, with Daniele Strawn (left) and Emma Wood (right)

Daniele is a long-time Slow Flowers Member who is a past guest of the Slow Flowers Podcast. We spent several days together in the spring of 2016 when Daniele organized a Slow Flowers in California’s North Bay area. Daniele was my guide to tour flower farms, visit design studios and learn more about the stories of the emerging community for local flowers.

JoLee Blooms bouquet
A signature seasonal arrangement by JoLee Blooms.

She had a few cameo appearances during the four-part series I recorded on that tour, but this episode is devoted entirely to Daniele’s story and JoLee Blooms.

Daniele and stock
Left: Daniele Strawn; right: a rainbow of field-grown stock, one of JoLee Blooms & Design’s favorite crops

I’m so excited to share my conversation with Daniele, as we discuss some of the infrastructure issues and operational decisions she’s making for JoLee Blooms, now wrapping up its sixth season. Daniele has been growing and designing in Sonoma County California even longer than that, so she has much wisdom to impart with her straight-talk.

JoLee Blooms floral arrangement
The autumn arrangement, designed on camera for our Slow Flowers Show

About Daniele:

Here’s more about Daniele Strawn, adapted from her website’s “About” page:

“With all my love, commitment, and joy, I am so proud to bring you JoLee Blooms & Design – a boutique flower farm and sustainable floral design studio located in the sunny hills of West Sonoma County.

“From my first memories playing in the evergreens & waterfalls of the Olympic Peninsula, to weeklong backpacking adventures along California’s golden coast – I have always had a deep appreciation for the great outdoors and the many splendors of our natural world.

“With an eclectic background in Event & Project Coordination, Interior Design & Architecture, Business Administration and Outdoor & Elementary Education, plus a lifelong love of gardening that started in my grandfathers’ gardens, I began honing my farming & floristry skills in 2013 at a flower farm and floral studio in Petaluma, California.”

Daniele Strawn, JoLee Blooms & Design
Daniele and Jeremy
Left, Daniele Strawn; Right, Jeremy Strawn, of JoLee Blooms & Design

About JoLee Blooms & Designs

“Naming my business JoLee is my way of paying homage to both of my grandfathers, Joe (maternal) and Lee (paternal). Both men were raised on farms during the great depression, were avid gardeners in their later years and both taught me (and all of their grandkids who were willing and interested) what it means to have a green thumb and enjoy hard work outdoors.
It seemed fitting that their names combined sound so feminine and French (Jolie is the French word for “pretty one”) as I am the only one in my family, of French descent, to be pursuing a life in agriculture and I happen to be growing nature’s pretty ones – flowers!
And my passion and love for using the flowers we’ve grown here on our small farm and then turning them into unique floral creations for your special day is an added touch of femininity & beauty that I am proud to add to my family’s agricultural legacy.”

JoLee Blooms' growing fields
JoLee Blooms’ growing fields
Map of Bloomfield California
A simple street map of Bloomfield, California, with X’s to indicate the close proximity between Daniele and Jeremy’s home, the studio, and 2 growing areas.

Find and follow JoLee Blooms & Design:
Instagram and Pinterest


This Week’s News

Hannah Morgan

It’s November and we’re getting ready to host our NOVEMBER Slow Flowers Meet-Up, Friday, November 11th at 9 am Pacific/Noon Eastern. We’ll welcome member and designer Hannah Morgan of Fortunate Orchard for our first in-studio Meet-Up when we explore Slow + Seasonal Wreaths – from Harvest to Holiday. Hannah will open up Fortunate Orchard’s brand new design studio in Seattle to share her wreathmaking tips and advice. She will cover: 

  • Recommended Supply List
  • Ingredients and Recipes (including wild-gathered and foraging best practices)
  • Mechanics and Methods
  • Care and Shipping Options
  • Selling Your Wreaths

You need to pre-register to join us and you can find the sign up link below or in the profile menu at our Instagram page @slowflowerssociety. See you there!


Hot off the Press: Slow Flowers Journal Fall 2022 Issue

Slow Flowers Journal

Speaking of gorgeous holiday wreaths, I hope you’ve seen the new FALL edition of the Slow Flowers Journal, published last week. “Harvest & Holidays” is a digital issue filled with 66-page of news, features, profiles, columns, and essays — and beautiful photography — to shine a light on the Slow Flowers Community. 

Published as a collaboration between BLOOM Imprint and Slow Flowers Society, this quarterly magazine is tailored to flower-farmers, floral designers, and gardening consumers who have embraced the floral lifestyle.  Our subscription is free to Slow Flowers Members. And we’re sharing this issue for free with Slow Flowers Podcast listeners, too — find the link to download below.

Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thank you to The Gardener’s Workshop, which offers a full curriculum of online education for flower farmers and farmer-florists. Online education is more important this year than ever, and you’ll want to check out the course offerings at thegardenersworkshop.com.

Thank you to Details Flowers Software, a platform specifically designed to help florists and designers do more and earn more. With an elegant and easy-to-use system–Details is here to improve profitability, productivity, and organization for floral businesses of all shapes and sizes. Grow your bottom line through professional proposals and confident pricing with Details’ all-in-one platform. All friends of the Slow Flowers Podcast will receive a 7-day free trial of Details Flowers Software. Learn more at detailsflowers.com.

Thank you to Mayesh Wholesale Florist. Family-owned since 1978, Mayesh is the premier wedding and event supplier in the U.S. and we’re thrilled to partner with Mayesh to promote local and domestic flowers, which they source from farms large and small around the U.S. Learn more at mayesh.com.


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining us today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too.

If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.

Music credits:

Dippler; Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad 
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 582: It’s Mum Season with Harmony Harvest Farm’s Jessica Hall and Stephanie Duncan

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2022
Stephanie Duncan and Jessica Hall
Sisters Stephanie Duncan (left) and Jessica Hall (right) of Harmony Harvest Farm

This episode came together just in time for you to learn about two Mum-related events taking place virtually and in-person at Harmony Harvest Farm next weekend. A few days ago, I jumped in the recording studio to chat with long-time Slow Flowers members, sisters Stephanie Duncan and Jessica Hall of Harmony Harvest Farm.

Past guests of the Slow Flowers Podcast (Episode 283, February 2017), Stephanie and Jessica farm with their partner and mom, Chris Auville in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley. Today, we’re going all in on MUMS. Featured in Southern Living magazine’s October 2022 issue, chrysanthemums are Harmony Harvest Farm’s signature flower and Jessica has been growing them for over a decade. Every year, Harmony Harvest propagates from more than 80 heirloom mother plants in addition to growing trial varieties of mums for international breeders.

the mum directory
Check out the full Mum Gallery here

There is a full complement of Mum educational content available at HHFShop.com.

Let’s jump right in and get started ~ I guarantee you’ll want to grow and design with these beautiful autumn blooms. Thanks so much for joining us today.

Click here to register for November 4th Virtual Mum Summit
and the November 5th Mum showcase taking place at Harmony Harvest Farm, including a design demonstration by celebrity floral designer TJ McGrath!

Mum Bouquet and field crops

You’ll also find links to Jessica’s online course THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO GROWING MUMS, and see a beautiful photo gallery of the mums you can grow if you’re in zones 3 to 9.


News of the Week

Slow Flowers Member Appreciation Month

Thank you to all of our special guests who joined me on the Slow Flowers Podcast, on our Instagram Live on Tuesdays and in the Zoom Room each Thursday during the month of October — for Member Appreciation Month. We welcomed eight new members last month and the name of each was entered into a random drawing for a fantastic gift — our 3-year Perennial Membership — valued at $649. The winners are Elissa McKinley & Tylor Hine of Sweetpea Enterprises, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Congratulations! We’ll be in touch to share all the details!


Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

And thank you to the Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, a farmer-owned cooperative committed to providing the very best the Pacific Northwest has to offer in cut flowers, foliage and plants. The Growers Market’s mission is to foster a vibrant marketplace that sustains local flower farms and provides top-quality products and service to the local floral industry. Visit them at seattlewholesalegrowersmarket.com.

Thanks to Longfield Gardens, which provides home gardeners with high quality flower bulbs and perennials. Their online store offers plants for every region and every season, from tulips and daffodils to dahlias, caladiums and amaryllis. Check out the full catalog at Longfield Gardens at longfield-gardens.com.

Thanks to Johnny’s Selected Seeds, an employee-owned company that provides our industry the best flower, herb and vegetable seeds — supplied to farms large and small and even backyard cutting gardens like mine. Find the full catalog of flower seeds and bulbs at johnnysseeds.com.


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining us today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too. If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.

Music credits:

Algea Trio; Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely

by Tryad 
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 581: Meet Laura Gonzalez of Swallows Secret Garden, a gardener-florist and land steward in Santa Cruz, California

Wednesday, October 26th, 2022

I met today’s guest, Laura Gonzalez, at the 2021 Slow Flowers Summit, which took place in the SF Bay Area at Filoli Historic House and Gardens.

Garden and trees
Swallows Secret Garden and the tree canopy that provides habitat to the resident swallows

She lives nearby, in a beautiful place called Swallows Secret Garden. Laura aspires to share the joy and beauty of the flowers she grows with customers, friends, and neighbors in the Santa Cruz community by growing a diverse collection of artisanal and seasonal flowers. She says: “As Gardener-in-Chief, I craft each arrangement exclusively from flowers and plants grown on site.”

Watch our Slow Flowers Video with member voiceovers that include Laura Gonzalez

If you watched our award-winning Slow Flowers video, released one year ago, you will have heard Laura’s voice as she spoke about the value of Slow Flowers Society. She says: “When I joined Slow Flowers, I felt like I had found the floral mothership. We’re all just sharing an exchange of information and a feeling of support that’s incredible.”

Swallows Secret Garden
A trio of daily arrangements, harvested from Swallows Secret Garden and designed by Laura Gonzalez

I wanted to learn about Laura’s operation, about the origin of her business name (all about those resident swallows) and how she came to flowers. First, you’ll watch a short video introduction that Laura created to share. And then we’ll wrap up with a Q&A. I know you’ll enjoy learning about this gardener-florist.

Find and follows Swallows Secret Garden on Instagram


News for the Week

October Member Month

This is the final week of the month and as you have heard, October is our Slow Flowers Society Member Appreciation Month. Perhaps you have enjoyed our bonus content, offered all month long, including Tuesday’s Instagram Live conversations with members on special topics, and Thursday’s Lunchtime Zoom Conversations with Tonneli Gruetter, our membership manager.

And if you haven’t joined us as a member, this is your final reminder to click on over to slowflowerssociety.com where you will find details on joining — all October new members and all members who upgrade from Standard to Premium Level will be included in drawing for a fantastic gift. One name will receive our Perennial Level membership– that’s 3 years, with a $649 value. Please reach out with any questions – membership@slowflowers.com.

Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thanks to Store It Cold, creators of the revolutionary CoolBot, a popular solution for flower farmers, studio florists and farmer-florists.  Save $1000s when you build your own walk-in cooler with the CoolBot and an air conditioner.  Don’t have time to build your own?  They also have turnkey units available. Learn more at storeitcold.com.   

Thanks to the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers. Formed in 1988, ASCFG was created to educate, unite, and support commercial cut flower growers. It mission is to help growers produce high-quality floral material, and to foster and promote the local availability of that product. Learn more at ascfg.org.

Thanks to Red Twig Farms. Based in Johnstown, Ohio, Red Twig Farms is a family-owned farm specializing in peonies, daffodils, tulips and branches, a popular peony-bouquet-by-mail program and their Spread the Hope Campaign where customers purchase 10 tulip stems for essential workers and others in their community. Learn more at redtwigfarms.com


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining us today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too. If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.

Music credits:

Blue Straggler; Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad 
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 580V: High desert flower farming with Trisha Starkey of Petals and Pages

Wednesday, October 19th, 2022

This week, we meet another inspiring Slow Flowers member, a farmer-florist whose Fernley, Nevada, enterprise is inspiring, considering some of the challenging growing conditions there. Trisha Starkey, owner of Petals and Pages Flowers, is farming in her fourth season. Her farm is situated 35 miles outside of Reno, at 4,500 feet elevation.

Trisha Starkey
Trisha Starkey of Petals and Pages Flowers in Fernley, Nevada

We’ll start out this episode with a 30-minute narrated tour that Trisha filmed for us — she introduces us to important infrastructure features, discusses her watering and growing practices, and shows off the late season flowers. Petals and Pages is located in USDA Zones 7b/8a and surprisingly, the area hasn’t yet been hit by frost.

Starkey Family
Petals and Pages is an all-family affair. From left: Patricia, Jaxon and Derek

Here’s a bit more about Trisha Starkey and her farm. Petals and Pages is a Certified Naturally Grown family farm dedicated to growing unique flowers. It is also a design studio and floral experience for couples who seek authentic, one-of-a-kind designs that help celebrate their special day. Her story is long and relatable, and you’ll want to read her personal narrative, excerpted here:

In 2015 we purchased our 1970’s era home on just shy of an 1.25 acre plot. We signed the final paperwork in the fall as the trees and shrubs on the property stood bare and the house felt cold and drafty. At first, we just chalked this up to the time of year and the lack of recent residents but come spring of 2016 we began to piece together that the house and land had been severely neglected.  Derek set out to restore it little by little and I began to daydream about relocating to an area known for more fertile soil.  As time went on and more issues arose we began to feel deflated. We bled cash to fix emergency breaks in the house, and the movie “The Money Pit” starring Tom Hanks and Shelly Long was like watching our lives on screen (but much funnier).  2017 and 2018 almost broke us as new home owners but we are both fiercely stubborn and wouldn’t give up.  Slowly over time our innovative minds began thinking of the house and land as more of a companion rather than a small child stomping their feet while hurling obstacles our way. Looking back, I think this change of view was a turning point for us.  

Derek built up his compost bins, we planted trees, shrubs, and bulbs, we pruned our sad trees, and added beneficials to the soils and instead of “cleaning up” the natural debris of the fall season we began leaving it to rot away.  This suddenly changed our soils.  We could dig down and actually see life happening! It was a very exciting time for us, simultaneously, it was around this time that I started paying attention to how unmotivated I was by my days in the office. We knew that if we were going to someday turn our farming hobby into a full-blown career and functioning farm I had to pour my heart, soul and most importantly time into it. After months of stress and exhaustion, I wrote my resignation letter.

Since that day, we’ve never looked back. Sure, there are absolutely days where I wonder what on earth we’re doing and question my own sanity but mostly I look around and feel overwhelmed with gratitude that I get to create, grow, and pour love into this land with my incredible family by my side. To read more in depth click HERE for our first part of a three part series of blogs.

“Our History,” from Petals and Pages Flowers
Petals and Pages logo

Thanks so much for joining us today. Trisha and I ran out of time, but I wanted to share one of her future goals. She says, “In 2024, we will have a beautiful space to welcome customers to our farm for a more hands-on learning experience. We want to help others grow on small scale farms and become profitable farms, too. We also would like to host workshops on our farm and hold farm to table dinners with local food and flowers.”

That’s something to look forward to! By the way, Trisha — if you’re still looking for a “D” name for your 4th compost bin, I suggests you name it “Debra” – ha!

Find and Follow Petals and Pages Flowers at these social places:
Petals and Pages on Instagram


News for the Week

October Member Month

October as membership appreciation month continues and you’re invited to get involved. You can find the full schedule of Tuesday’s Instagram Live sessions with me and Thursday Zoom Lunches with Tonneli Gruetter, our membership and community engagement manager.

Also this month, any new member who joins and any Standard level member who upgrades to Premium will be included in our drawing for our Perennial Membership — a three-year membership. That’s a $649 value! Please reach out to Tonneli at membership@slowflowers.com, with any questions.


Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thanks to Mayesh Wholesale Florist. Family-owned since 1978, Mayesh is the premier wedding and event supplier in the U.S. and we’re thrilled to partner with Mayesh to promote local and domestic flowers, which they source from farms large and small around the U.S. Learn more at mayesh.com.

Thanks to Details Flowers Software, a platform specifically designed to help florists and designers do more and earn more. With an elegant and easy-to-use system–Details is here to improve profitability, productivity, and organization for floral businesses of all shapes and sizes. Grow your bottom line through professional proposals and confident pricing with Details’ all-in-one platform. All friends of the Slow Flowers Podcast will receive a 7-day free trial of Details Flowers Software. Learn more at detailsflowers.com.

Thanks to CalFlowers, the leading floral trade association in California, providing valuable transportation and other benefits to flower growers and the entire floral supply chain in California and 48 other states. The Association is a leader in bringing fresh cut flowers to the U.S. market and in promoting the benefits of flowers to new generations of American consumers. Learn more at cafgs.org.


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining us today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too. If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.


Music credits:

Town Market; Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad 
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 579: Flower farming with your sister, with Becky Osborne and Kate Munno of Connecticut’s Becky at Appleberry Farm

Wednesday, October 12th, 2022

Today, I want to introduce you to the women behind Becky at Appleberry Farm, Becky Osborne and Kate Munno. Becky at Appleberry Farm is based in Sandy Hook, Connecticut and is part of the Connecticut Flower Collective.

When a floral designer or flower farmer joins the Slow Flowers Society as members, if I’m not already doing so, I immediately check out their social places and follow them on Instagram and Facebook. Because Kate and Becky post a daily reel on Instagram, I couldn’t help but see their silly, but totally on-target content over the past year. When they registered to attend the Slow Flowers Summit this past June, I was thrilled to know I would meet them.

Kate and becky
Kate Munno (left) and Becky Osborne (right), sisters and the team behind Becky at Appleberry Farm

By way of background, the sisters say their business started from a love of watching their mom arrange flowers growing up. Becky at Appleberry creates floral arrangements and installations for any and every occasion using flowers that they grow themselves, or source from other local growers if it’s a specific that they don’t grow!

Appleberry Farm
Appleberry Farm

Their great-grandfather, Robert Young (R.Y.) Brown purchased the Keane dairy farm in 1939 as a place where he and his wife Dorothy could provide roots for their children, Betty Lou and Bob. Their family named the property Appleberry Farm for the apple orchard and the fields of blackberries that grew on the property. Many years later, Betty Lou and her husband Jim in turn raised their children at Appleberry Farm. Four generations (and hundreds of animals, laughs, swims, parties, adventures, and multitudes of shenanigans) later, Betty Lou’s granddaughter Kate and her husband David bought the farm and, together with Kate’s sister Becky, are working to reinvigorate Appleberry Farm as a cut flower farm and magical place.

Bouquets at Appleberry Farm
Bouquets for a wedding (left) and CSA customer (right)

You will love this episode and be sure to find and follow Becky at Appleberry Farm on Instagram, especially for Kate and Becky’s daily installment of Reels from the farm.

Find and Follow Becky at Appleberry Farm:

Instagram and Facebook


News for the Week

October Member Month

This month, during October Membership Appreciation Month, any new member who joins and any Standard level member who upgrades to Premium will be included in our drawing for our Perennial Membership — a three-year membership. That’s a $649 value! Please reach out to Tonneli, our membership and community engagement manager at membership@slowflowers.com, with any questions.

TikTok with Neisha
Niesha Blancas, of Fetching Social, our Slow Flowers Society social media expert

Slow Flowers Member Appreciation Month continues at you’re invited to join our Slow Flowers Member Virtual Meet-Up this Friday, October 14th at 9 am PST/Noon Eastern.

Our monthly topic is quite timely, especially after today’s conversation with Becky and Kate. We’ll be Tackling TikTok with Niesha Blancas. You’ve probably noticed that the rules on Instagram keep changing and your posts are likely not reaching the audiences you enjoyed in the recent past. According to our own social media expert, Niesha Blancas of Fetching Social, that’s because of the exploding viewership of IG Reels and, of course, TikTok. You’ve also probably noticed that our IG account (@slowflowerssociety) is featuring more Reels than ever before (71% of our August posts were Reels) . That’s thanks to Niesha. In fact, last month, our reach was 88k, with 14.7 k impressions and 81.2 k Reel views.

Niesha will share a one-hour dive into what you need to know about Reels and TikTok – even if you’ve never created this type of content. Look for her posts on @slowflowerssociety leading up to our Meet-Up because she’ll be asking for your questions. Newbies will have lots to learn and members who are already making Reels and experimenting with TikTok accounts will pick up some expert tips! Niesha might even share how she created her most popular TikTok post which garnered 600k+ views!

You will need to pre-register at the link below. The link to join is also in our Instagram bio @slowflowersociety.


Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thanks to The Gardener’s Workshop, which offers a full curriculum of online education for flower farmers and farmer-florists. Online education is more important this year than ever, and you’ll want to check out the course offerings at thegardenersworkshop.com.

Thanks to Longfield Gardens, which provides home gardeners with high quality flower bulbs and perennials. Their online store offers plants for every region and every season, from tulips and daffodils to dahlias, caladiums and amaryllis. Check out the full catalog at Longfield Gardens at longfield-gardens.com.

Thanks to Johnny’s Selected Seeds, an employee-owned company that provides our industry the best flower, herb and vegetable seeds — supplied to farms large and small and even backyard cutting gardens like mine. Find the full catalog of flower seeds and bulbs at johnnysseeds.com.


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining us today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too.

If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com. I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.


Music credits:

Nu Fornacis; Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad 
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 578: Accidental flower farmers share their roots, with Tracy Yang and Nick Songsangcharntara of JARN Co. 

Wednesday, October 5th, 2022
Tracy Yang and Nick Songsangcharntara of JARN Co. Flower Farm

Today, you’re invited to join me on a quick visit to JARN Co., a 2nd year flower farm based in Monroe, Washington.

Tracy Yang at JARN Co.
Tracy Yang harvests dahlias in late September in Monroe, Washington

Even though they are based in my own backyard, I had to travel all the way across the country to the Boston area to meet flower farmer Tracy Yang, co-founder of JARN Co., at the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers conference this past August. I recognized her nametag because Jarn Co. had recently joined Slow Flowers Society as members. As we talked, I heard enough of Tracy’s story to prompt me to invite myself for a visit before the season ends.

Tracy, Nick and Donut
Tracy, Nick and their flower farm puppy, Donut

Tracy farms with her partner Nick Songsangcharntara on four acres of land leased from a former bamboo nursery off of Hwy 2, the route that I’ve taken many times on trips east across the Cascade Mountains to places like Leavenworth and Wenatchee.

We filmed a quick tour of the dahlia fields and then sat in the shade to record this interview. Tracy and Nick say their story is rather peculiar because they never intended to be farmers.

On the farm with Nick
On the farm with Nick

In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic changed everything and suddenly, they found themselves understudies of Tracy’s mom (Mama Yang), learning everything they could about floriculture and agriculture. Jarn Co. was born — and you’ll hear the story behind their business name in today’s interview.

Tracy with lilies
Tracy with lilies

Thanks so much for joining us today. It’s clear that these two are passionate about local flowers and agriculture as they develop their business to supply the Seattle area and their local community with beautiful, sustainable flowers. Although not certified, Tracy and Nick use sustainable, organic practices to cultivate flowers and produce and they do not use pesticides or any kind of synthetic chemicals on their crops.

Turns out, I’ve been mispronouncing JARN Co. — It’s “Jahn” not “Jarn.” (so so sorry!)
As Nick and Tracy explain on their website: The ‘jarn’ in JARN Co. is pronounced “jahn.” ‘Jarn’ is the English romanization of the thai word “จันทร์.” จันทร์ translated means ‘moon’. The inspiration for our name came from Nick’s last name ‘Songsangcharntara’ which means ‘moonlight.’

Find JARN Co. on Instagram and Facebook
Subscribe to JARN Co.’s Newsletter


Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thank you to the Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, a farmer-owned cooperative committed to providing the very best the Pacific Northwest has to offer in cut flowers, foliage and plants. The Growers Market’s mission is to foster a vibrant marketplace that sustains local flower farms and provides top-quality products and service to the local floral industry. Visit them at seattlewholesalegrowersmarket.com.

Thank you to Red Twig Farms. Based in Johnstown, Ohio, Red Twig Farms is a family-owned farm specializing in peonies, daffodils, tulips and branches, a popular peony-bouquet-by-mail program and their Spread the Hope Campaign where customers purchase 10 tulip stems for essential workers and others in their community. Learn more at redtwigfarms.com.

Thank you to the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers. Formed in 1988, ASCFG was created to educate, unite, and support commercial cut flower growers. It mission is to help growers produce high-quality floral material, and to foster and promote the local availability of that product. Learn more at ascfg.org.


This Week’s News

October Member Month

It’s October and we’re kicking off this month as our Slow Flowers Member Appreciation Month. Check out more details in our October newsletter – that just dropped this week. Top things to note:
Tuesdays in October, you can join me on IG Live at @slowflowerssociety noon Pacific/3 pm Eastern.
Thursdays in October, join our membership and community engagement manager, Tonneli Gruetter of Salty Acres Farm, at the same time — noon Pacific/3 pm Eastern in the Zoom Room for a lunchtime membership chat.
As we say in our Welcome to October video, We are so grateful to our Members like YOU — because Slow Flowers Society members ARE the Slow Flowers Movement! 


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining us today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too.

If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com and consider making a donation to sustain Slow Flowers’ ongoing advocacy, education and outreach activities. You can find the donate button at slowflowerspodcast.com.


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.


Music credits:

Capering; Turning on the Lights; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

Related posts

Episode 577: Building a home-based cut flower business with Backyard Blooms’ Janet Kramka

Wednesday, September 28th, 2022

You’re in for a treat today with my conversation featuring Janet Kramka of Backyard Blooms, based in Trumbull, Connecticut. In August, Janet and I participated in a webinar for New York’s Madison Square Park Conservancy’s horticultural lecture series — all about the Slow Flowers Movement. It was really fun to share the screen with a Slow Flowers member who is walking the talk in her practices as a small-scale farmer-florist.

Janet Kramka and forgetmenots
Janet (left) and her newest summer crop, Chinese forget me nots (Cynoglossum amabile)
buckets and bouquets
Buckets of bunches and bouquets

Through that experience, I became fascinated with Janet’s personal story of pivoting to a second career after working in the graphic design field. She recorded a special video tour of Backyard Blooms’ “backyard” in Connecticut where Janet grows mostly annuals and dahlias in raised beds.

Teamwork
Janet and her husband Pete, who has adopted flower farming as his second profession.

It’s really impressive to see the scale of what she’s built with the land available to her. Backyard Blooms grows and sells custom bouquets, flower subscriptions and DIY buckets direct to consumers, as well as maintaining a presence at the popular Trumbull Farmers’ Market. They offer wholesale flowers to florists through the Connecticut Flower Collective.

building raised beds
A photograph from 2019, depicting how Janet and Pete established their first raised beds.
summer flowers
And here’s how Backyard Blooms appeared in July 2022.

Today’s conversation focuses on Backyard Blooms’ services, customer base and regional market.

“What started as a love of nature and gardening has blossomed into our small-but-mighty family farm where we are committed to growing flowers sustainably and organically. Our blooms are local, unique, and grown with great care for florists, designers, and anyone who delights in the beauty of flowers.”

janet kramka, backyard blooms
Tulips
The spring tulip bounty at Backyard Blooms

Follow Backyard Blooms on Instagram and Facebook.


More Resources

The replay video of our Slow Flowers Presentation recorded on August 18th for Madison Square Park Conservancy

LISTEN: Slow Flowers Podcast Episode 494 with farmer-florist Haley Billipp of Eddy Farm and Connecticut Flower Collective.


Thank you to our Sponsors

This show is brought to you by Slowflowers.com, the free, online directory to more than 850 florists, shops, and studios who design with local, seasonal and sustainable flowers and to the farms that grow those blooms.  It’s the conscious choice for buying and sending flowers.

Farmgirl Flowers 2022

Thank you to our lead sponsor, Farmgirl Flowers. Farmgirl Flowers delivers iconic burlap-wrapped bouquets and lush, abundant arrangements to customers across the U.S., supporting U.S. flower farms by purchasing more than $10 million dollars of U.S.-grown fresh and seasonal flowers and foliage annually. Discover more at farmgirlflowers.com.

Thank you to Store It Cold, creators of the revolutionary CoolBot, a popular solution for flower farmers, studio florists and farmer-florists.  Save $1000s when you build your own walk-in cooler with the CoolBot and an air conditioner.  Don’t have time to build your own? They also have turnkey units available. Learn more at storeitcold.com.

Thank you to CalFlowers, the leading floral trade association in California, providing valuable transportation and other benefits to flower growers and the entire floral supply chain in California and 48 other states. The Association is a leader in bringing fresh cut flowers to the U.S. market and in promoting the benefits of flowers to new generations of American consumers. Learn more at cafgs.org.

Thank you to Details Flowers Software, a platform specifically designed to help florists and designers do more and earn more. With an elegant and easy-to-use system–Details is here to improve profitability, productivity, and organization for floral businesses of all shapes and sizes. Grow your bottom line through professional proposals and confident pricing with Details’ all-in-one platform. All friends of the Slow Flowers Podcast will receive a 7-day free trial of Details Flowers Software. Learn more at detailsflowers.com.


Slow Flowers Podcast Logo with flowers, recorder and mic

Thanks so much for joining us today! The Slow Flowers Podcast is a member-supported endeavor, downloaded more than 900,000 times by listeners like you. Thank you for listening, commenting and sharing – it means so much. As our movement gains more supporters and more passionate participants who believe in the importance of our domestic cut flower industry, the momentum is contagious. I know you feel it, too.

If you’re new to our weekly Show and our long-running Podcast, check out all of our resources at SlowFlowersSociety.com and consider making a donation to sustain Slow Flowers’ ongoing advocacy, education and outreach activities. You can find the donate button at slowflowerspodcast.com.


Debra in the Slow Flowers Cutting Garden
Thank you for listening! Sending love, from my cutting garden to you! (c) Missy Palacol Photography

I’m Debra Prinzing, host and producer of the Slow Flowers Show & Podcast. The Slow Flowers Podcast is engineered and edited by Andrew Brenlan. The content and opinions expressed here are either mine alone or those of my guests alone, independent of any podcast sponsor or other person, company or organization.  Next week, you’re invited to join me in putting more Slow Flowers on the table, one stem, one vase at a time.


Music credits:

Flattered; Gaena
by Blue Dot Sessions
http://www.sessions.blue

Lovely
by Tryad 
http://tryad.bandcamp.com/album/instrumentals
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

In The Field
audionautix.com

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